BIOMATERNITY Fertility Specialsts-ENDOMETRIAL INJURY

 Endometrial Injury
(Hysteroscopy with Implantation Cuts)

A healthy young woman has approximately a 25% chance to achieve a successful pregnancy with each menstrual cycle. After about 1 year of trying to become pregnant, 15% of couples will remain unsuccessful. At that point, an evaluation is typically done and some type of fertility treatment is initiated. Approximately half of all human embryo implantations result in failed pregnancy. Multiple factors may contribute to this failure, including genetic or metabolic abnormalities of the embryo. However, many of these spontaneous early abortion cases are attributed to poor uterine receptivity. Furthermore, although many fertility disorders have been overcome by a variety of assisted reproductive techniques, implantation remains the rate-limiting step for the success of the in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments.

The receptiveness of the mother’s endometrium (the lining of the uterus/womb) is crucial. The endometrium, physiologically during each menstrual cycle, undergoes a series of changes leading to a specific period of receptivity called window of implantation out of which it is resistant to embryo attachment.

Endometrial injury involves causing intentional “injury” to the endometrium through biopsy or curettage prior to an assisted reproduction treatment; this procedure enhances endometrium receptivity and improves the rate of implantation.

After endometrial injury, cytokines (a broad and loose category of small proteins that are important in cell signaling) that are released during the repair process induce endometrial changes favorable for implantation. Endometrial injury also induces decidualization (a characteristic of the endometrium of the pregnant uterus; it is a response of maternal cells to the hormone progesterone), which favors implantation as well. The healing after the injury slows endometrial development, which is otherwise accelerated after stimulation, thereby increasing the likelihood for an in-phase endometrium at the time of transfer.

 

 

BIOMATERNITY Fertility Specialsts-ENDOMETRIAL INJURY-The menstrual cycle. FSH, follicle-stimulating hormone. LH, luteinizing hormone. (INFOGRAPHICS)(1062 × 1136)(LR)
BIOMATERNITY Fertility Specialsts-ENDOMETRIAL INJURY

 Endometrial Injury
(Hysteroscopy with Implantation Cuts)

A healthy young woman has approximately a 25% chance to achieve a successful pregnancy with each menstrual cycle. After about 1 year of trying to become pregnant, 15% of couples will remain unsuccessful. At that point, an evaluation is typically done and some type of fertility treatment is initiated. Approximately half of all human embryo implantations result in failed pregnancy. Multiple factors may contribute to this failure, including genetic or metabolic abnormalities of the embryo. However, many of these spontaneous early abortion cases are attributed to poor uterine receptivity. Furthermore, although many fertility disorders have been overcome by a variety of assisted reproductive techniques, implantation remains the rate-limiting step for the success of the in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments.

BIOMATERNITY Fertility Specialsts-ENDOMETRIAL INJURY-The menstrual cycle. FSH, follicle-stimulating hormone. LH, luteinizing hormone. (INFOGRAPHICS)(1062 × 1136)(LR)

The receptiveness of the mother’s endometrium (the lining of the uterus/womb) is crucial. The endometrium, physiologically during each menstrual cycle, undergoes a series of changes leading to a specific period of receptivity called window of implantation out of which it is resistant to embryo attachment.

Endometrial injury involves causing intentional “injury” to the endometrium through biopsy or curettage prior to an assisted reproduction treatment; this procedure enhances endometrium receptivity and improves the rate of implantation.

After endometrial injury, cytokines (a broad and loose category of small proteins that are important in cell signaling) that are released during the repair process induce endometrial changes favorable for implantation. Endometrial injury also induces decidualization (a characteristic of the endometrium of the pregnant uterus; it is a response of maternal cells to the hormone progesterone), which favors implantation as well. The healing after the injury slows endometrial development, which is otherwise accelerated after stimulation, thereby increasing the likelihood for an in-phase endometrium at the time of transfer.

 

 

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